Tag Archives: Dental Occlusion

Eight Problems With Your Teeth (And How You Can Fix Them)

Eight Problems With Your Teeth (And How You Can Fix Them)

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One of the worst pains that you can experience is toothache. It feels utterly unrelenting and seems to take over every part of your body with its throbbing pain – and to add insult to injury, you can’t even eat anything that might make you feel better because that just makes the pain worse. Dental pain is one of the biggest causes of chronic pain and it can really blight your quality of life. Luckily, there are some things you can do to help solve some common problems that you might have with your teeth…

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Tooth Sensitivity

A huge number of people suffer from sensitivity in their teeth – known as dentin sensitivity – which means that they have a level of discomfort when consuming certain foods and drinks. It’s such a common problems that it’s estimated that half the population suffers from it, although the pain can thankfully come and go, so you might not have a sensitive tooth at all times. Many people find that they have sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures – meaning that your morning coffee or that ice cream you enjoy as a treat a couple of times a week might be an issue. You might also have problems with sugary, sticky foods. If you think you may be suffering from tooth sensitivity, it might be caused by receding gums or periodontal disease. You could always ask your dentist about the reasons behind your particular tooth sensitivity, and in the meantime start using a toothpaste that’s designed for sensitive teeth.

Bad Breath

Is there anything more embarrassing than bad breath? Of all the dental problems out there, bad breath is the one least likely to elicit sympathetic responses. Bad breath, otherwise known as halitosis, is caused by dental problems up to 85% of the time, so if you’re embarrassed about your breath, don’t stay quiet – chances are, there are things you can do to fix it. Gum disease, cavities, dry mouth and oral cancer can all cause bad breath, so if you think that using mouthwash to cover up the smell is a long term solution, it’s probably better to talk to your dentist instead. Have your teeth thoroughly cleaned by the hygienist, and make sure that you brush twice a day and regularly floss. You could also try using a tongue scraper.

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Tooth Decay

Tooth decay is otherwise known as cavities, and is an incredibly common problem – yet it’s also very painful and sometimes expensive to resolve, so should be avoided at all costs. It’s caused by the build up of plaque on our teeth – this is a sticky substance that builds up over the course of the day in between brushing. Acid is created when plaque reacts to the starches and sugars in our food, and this leads to the erosion of the enamel on our teeth, and from there, tooth decay. The best way to stop yourself getting tooth decay is through making sure that you brush your teeth twice a day and that you regularly floss. Make sure you leave brushing until half an hour after you eat, because this can make your tooth enamel a little more fragile. You should also do your best to cut down on sugary and acidic food and drink.

Tooth Infection

Anyone who’s had a tooth infection will know that there are very few pains as bad as them. Tooth infections are caused by abscesses at the root of the tooth, or between the tooth and the gum, and can be caused by tooth decay, cracked teeth, or gingivitis – all of which can allow bacteria to enter the root of the tooth through openings in the tooth enamel. If you have a tooth infection, you’ll be able to tell from a throbbing, gnawing or sharp pain, along with possible symptoms like a fever, tooth sensitivity, and a bitter taste in your mouth. If you have these symptoms, go to your dentist immediately. If you can’t get an appointment quickly, try a service like http://dentist.24hourly.com or try to combat the pain using clove oil and keep rinsing your mouth out with salt water. You can also use over the counter painkillers to help out. To heal a tooth infection, your dentist may need to drain the abscess through the root or gum, or even to remove the tooth and place a crown in there instead. You will also be given antibiotics to help heal the infection.

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Dry Mouth

Although everyone has a dry mouth from time to time, it may be a sign that there’s a problem with your saliva producing glands if you often have a dry tongue, cracked lips, trouble chewing and mouth sores. Causes of dry mouth can include nervousness, stress, aging, some medications like antidepressants, or cancer treatment like radiation or chemotherapy. Although it doesn’t sound like a particularly big deal, dry mouth can be extremely uncomfortable and can also lead to tooth decay and other dental problems so it’s important to get it treated. The best way to do that is to find out what exactly is causing it, and treat that – and in the meantime, make sure you keep drinking plenty of fluids and maintaining your oral hygiene.

Gum Disease

Up to 75% of people are thought to suffer from some sort of periodontal disease, otherwise known as gum disease. It’s caused mainly by bacteria from plaque build up in your mouth and can be exacerbated by smoking, grinding your teeth and some medications. If you have gingivitis, the beginning stage of gum disease, it’s reversible and can be treated with medications and plaque removal by your dental hygienist. If you have more advanced gum disease, surgery may be required. You can halt gum disease in its steps by making sure that you keep brushing twice a day and flossing on a regular basis – there’s nothing more important than the upkeep of your oral hygiene.

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Dental Occlusion

If you have a problem with your dental occlusion, that means you have a problem with the way your teeth meet when your jaws bite together. That might mean you have a problem with your teeth, your jaw or your gums and you may have problems with fillings fracturing, broken teeth, or tender teeth; you might find the symptoms are more severe in times of stress. You might also suffer from headaches or jaw ache. The best way to deal with issues like this is to go and see your dentist to see if you have TMJ (temporo-mandible joint) problems. Counselling and relaxation techniques like mindfulness might just help, along with diet and exercise like physiotherapy. Dental guards which you wear at night can help with jaw clenching or tooth grinding, and your dentist can also help by adjusting your bite if they think that might be what your issue is.

Oral Cancer

Of course, of all the dental problems you might have, oral cancer is probably the most feared and serious. Regular trips to the dentist for check ups can often pick up on any changes in your mouth but you should always be aware of any white marks, small swellings or sore spots. There may also be areas of numbness or small patches of rough raised skin, or you might notice that there’s a difference in the way that your jaws fit together when you close your mouth. No matter what the exact issue is, whether it’s pain or swellings or discomfort when you move your tongue or jaw, make sure that you talk to your dentist – remember that no problem is too small or insignificant when it comes to your health.

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Tia, and TipsfromTia.com  is trying to keep you looking good and
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