Tag Archives: Melatonin

Tips for Beating Insomnia without Prescription Pills

Tips for Beating Insomnia without Prescription Pills

Unmade Bed

Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder in the United States. A recent survey found that 95 percent of adults nationwide experience insomnia at some point in their lives ― and roughly one-third reported insomnia-related sleep problems within the past year. Many people treat insomnia using prescribed medications. Many physicians recommend a class of non-benzodiazepines known as ‘z-drugs’, which have proven quite effective at reducing insomnia symptoms and are considered the go-to medication for this disorder. Other hypnotics and sedatives may be prescribed, as well.

Unfortunately, all prescribed medications used to treat insomnia carry potentially negative side effects. Although these vary by drug, some of the most common effects include daytime drowsiness, headaches, nausea and light sensitivity. Many are also habit-forming, and can lead to addictive tendencies if they are taken for long periods of time. This post will look at some of the most effective anti-insomnia measures you can take without prescription meds.

Types of Insomnia

In order to properly treat insomnia, it’s important to understand the different forms this sleep disorder can take. Secondary insomnia refers to symptoms that occur due to another injury, illness, prescription drug dependency or other conditions that can disrupt sleep patterns; primary insomnia, on the other hand, arises independently.

Insomnia may also be classified by duration. The term ‘short-term’ or ‘acute’ insomnia refers to symptoms that last for less than 30 days; after the 30-day benchmark, the condition progresses to chronic insomnia. Additionally, ‘transient’ insomnia applies to travelers who experience insomnia symptoms as they adapt to a different time zone; ‘jet lag’ is considered a type of short-term transient insomnia. Generally speaking, you should only seek treatment for insomnia once it has evolved into a chronic condition.

Some people with insomnia have a particularly tough time falling asleep; this is known as sleep-onset insomnia. Others struggle to remain asleep throughout the night; this is referred to as sleep-maintenance insomnia. This post will address treatment options for both sleep-onset and sleep-maintenance insomnia.

Option 1: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

This option (known as CBT for short) is a catch-all term for any type of sleep therapy that addresses insomnia symptoms. CBT has proven highly effective, and is regarded as comparable ― if not superior ― to prescription drugs. CBT often involves sleep restriction therapy (SRT), which requires the patient to follow a rigid sleep schedule every night and get up at the same time each morning. Realigning your sleep patterns to fit a certain window period is often the key to beating insomnia.

Another type of CBT commonly used for insomnia patients is stimulus control, which trains the patient to ignore stimuli (such as light and background noise) that hinder a good night’s sleep. Paradoxical intention may also be used; this reverse-psychology approach requires patients to lay in bed and remain awake as long as possible, allowing their minds to relax and their bodies to become naturally tired. Many CBT patients are asked to record their nighttime patterns in a sleep diary in order to see if progress is being made.

Option 2: Light Therapy

Many people experience insomnia due to disruptions to their Circadian rhythm, a biological 24-hour clock that operates in sync with natural sunlight. Light therapy (also known as phototherapy) uses bright lamps to trigger the suprachiasmatic nucleus area of the brain’s hypothalamus and help realign a patient’s Circadian cycle. Regular exposure to the lamplight will eventually get the patient back on track.

Generally speaking, light therapy requires exposure to the lamps for at least 30 minutes per day, preferably in the morning. Light therapy lamps utilize bulbs measured at roughly 10,000 lux; in contrast, household lights usually range between 50 and 80 lux. Light therapy is relatively expensive and completely drug-free. However, the artificial light is less effective for people who spend long periods of time under natural sunlight (i.e., those who work outside).

Option 3: Improved Sleep Hygiene

If you are struggling with insomnia, then there’s a good chance you can reduce some of your symptoms by changing your daily sleep habits. Cutting out nicotine and alcohol is a good start; you may want to curb your caffeine intake, as well. Also avoid activities like eating and exercising too close to bedtime. You may want to re-evaluate your mattress, as well, particularly if you have chronic back and/or shoulder pain; mattresses made of soft materials like latex and memory foam are designed to alleviate pain and pressure to a much greater extent than traditional innersprings.

Option 4: Melatonin

Melatonin is a natural hormone produced in the pineal gland that helps regulate Circadian rhythm and healthy sleep patterns. It is regulated by the amino acid tryptophan, also known as the sleep-inducing substance in foods like turkey. Many physicians encourage insomnia patients to take melatonin supplements because, unlike other anti-insomnia medications, melatonin is non-habit-forming and produces very few side effects. Melatonin is currently available as an over-the-counter medication.

Ben Murray is a writer and researcher for sleep science hub Tuck.com. He can usually be found running, hiking, biking or kayaking around the Pacific Northwest ― though he enjoys a good nap as much as the next person.

Tia, and TipsfromTia.com  is trying to keep you looking good and
feeling good, from the inside out. If you’ve got a problem or a tip email me! Be sure to Like and share on Facebook or Follow on Twitter or Instagram

I Can’t Lose Weight No Matter How Hard I Try. Stupid Tip of the Day:

By Tia Cristy

Stupid Tip of the Day: I Can’t Lose Weight No Matter How
Hard I Try.

Woman Stepping onto Scale

Losing weight can be one of the toughest things some individual’s will ever face. The number one thing in losing any amount of weight is being healthy about it. Trying to unload a massive amount of pounds overnight can have dangers. Yet, when dieting, those intending to lose a large amount of weight tend to notice the first few pounds come off quickly and then, the weight loss comes to a screeching halt. The reason for this is the metabolism is in shock of the body’s recent events.

A lot of times you’ll hear someone state that they gain weight after a certain age, having a baby, or they dieted and gained it back, …and then some. This is because the body’s natural chemistry has changed and changed the way the metabolism worked.

So, with that being said, I think it’s good to work out the metabolism first. With working out your metabolism first, it can shift gracefully with the new changes your body is about to endure.

The most important thing for the metabolism is proper sleep. ‘Proper’ doesn’t always mean 8 hours, but it does mean quality sleep. If you tend to sleep restless or wake up frequently, it affects everything including your digestion’s system of gathering and expelling what is needed, and not needed. It’s best to realize

Unmade Bed

sooner rather than later that all bodies are not built the same. It has been proven that women should try to get 1-2 hours more sleep than men. This is not always reality though, when it comes to maintaining the house and/or children something usually takes precedence. It’s my theory that this is one reason some women have a harder time losing pounds.

Getting the proper quality sleep sounds easier, than achieving to most people. But it doesn’t have to be that difficult. Adding the amino acid, Gaba, into your daily nighttime ritual can help with sleep, your metabolism, and brain—all at the same time. Taking Gaba as a natural sleep aid, along with Melatonin, can give you natural sleep without any grogginess or strange side effects.

Once the body’s sleep schedule is on track, the metabolism may need some extra help working properly. The way digestion works is simply complex. Simple, the body either uses the ingested, stores it for later, or disposes of it. When the metabolism isn’t working properly, it stores way too much, and that becomes fat. Taking to your doctor about adding a 400 mg. folic acid supplement into your morning routine can really boost the metabolism without sending it into some kind of dangerous overdrive.

When restarting the metabolism again, eating smaller portions more frequently is beneficial. Small portions are only hard in the beginning, but once you know you can eat every 2-3 hours, starvation isn’t an issue anymore.

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These are just a couple of things to do without changing any diet or activity in your life. These natural treatments can make a huge impact on those trying to lose a few pounds to simply maintaining a healthy weight. I always suggest, keep your doctor in the loop of any herbs, diet, or exercise you plan on participating with.

Facing weight issues can impact individuals on many levels. Finding a positive outlet to absorb your progress is important in the process. Some individuals involved in weight loss are trying to reach unrealistic goals while being at a healthy weight or slightly over. These people tend to see a different picture.  Remember, not everyone is built the same.

A clinically obese man, John, has taken a healthy start and made a web diary (http://ourpersonaljourney.wordpress.com/) of his struggles and process. John’s story is interesting because he never saw his weight or would let it slow him down in his mind. This journal helps him see his downfalls and accomplishments. Bravely, he’s out there sharing it with others. Sharing with others is not for everyone. But doing something like taking a weekly photo or writing a diary on the positives of your progress will make you face the facts and truths. As we’ve come to learn, mirrors and minds can lie.

Tia, and TipsfromTia.com  is trying to keep you looking good and
feeling good, from the inside out. If you’ve got a problem or a tip email me! Be sure to Like and share on Facebook or Follow on Twitter or Instagram.